Deep Blue

2003

Documentary /

0
IMDb Rating 7.5

Synopsis


Downloaded 1771 times
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1080p 720p
1.65G
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English
/
83 min
P/S 0 / 0
1.05G
Normal
English
/
83 min
P/S 2 / 1

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Philip Van der Veken 10

Ever since my childhood I&#39;ve been fascinated by all life under water. I was only two years old, had severely burned my arm and my parents didn&#39;t know how to make me forget about the pain. They decided to buy me a little fish tank with a couple of goldfish in it. And it worked, as I sat on my knees in front of it, I forgot about all the pain. My arm healed, but the passion remained and I&#39;ve always kept fishes as a pet ever since (I&#39;ve got two aquariums and a large pond now). I will also never miss any documentary about this wonderful creatures on television, but I hadn&#39;t seen this one before. Last Christmas, my mom found it on a double DVD and thought it would be a good present for me. She was right.<br/><br/>Even though the entire documentary is situated in the water, you&#39;ll get to see more than just a lot of fishes in all kinds of colors and sizes. You&#39;ll also get penguins, polar bears, whales, dolphins,... But there isn&#39;t just a diversity in the creatures that are shown. Also the environments change and that&#39;s a good thing. The polar sees are completely different from the tropical sees, the Atlantic different from the Pacific and together they make sure that you keep watching it with your full interest. More than once I found myself watching it with my mouth open. All the images were incredibly beautiful, but if this had been situated in one spot, than the 92 minutes would have been too long. Now I just couldn&#39;t get enough of it. And that&#39;s also where this movie&#39;s main weakness if you ask me. I wished that it would keep on going on for another 30 minutes or more. It just ended too soon.<br/><br/>If you are interested in everything that happens in that magnificent world under water, but don&#39;t want to learn scuba diving first, than this documentary is definitely a must see. The images are just wonderful, the music that accompanies it all is great,... Just let yourself be overwhelmed by the beauty and the powers of nature. It&#39;s an excellent documentary made by the BBC Natural History Unit. I give it a 10/10. (Just one last word of advice: try to watch it on a large screen and with an excellent surround system if you can, it can only add something extra to the experience.)

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Reviewed by lukey78 7

It&#39;s a very nice feeling watching a documentary like this on the big screen. You can feel the overwhelming power of waves bursting against rocky coastlines and experience the vastness of the ocean.<br/><br/>&quot;Deep Blue&quot; takes you on a journey from the coast to the coral reefs, then to the icy lands of the (ant-)arctic, and finally down to the most fascinating part of this movie: the deepest depths of the ocean, where not a single beam of light shatters through.<br/><br/>Most scenes are greatly composed of very clear, sharp and absolutely stunning images harmonized with the orchestral music of the Berliner Philharmoniker.<br/><br/>In one very nice and humorous scene where you see hundreds of fat penguins shambling over a sheet of ice, I nearly got the impression, also induced through the music, watching the marching scene of Edoras citizens in &quot;Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers&quot;. Might sound odd, but I guess I have a faible for &quot;large&quot; scenes with many actors moving on the big screen, supported by a big orchestra. There is another scene like this with little crawfish on the coast choreographed like a sports event.<br/><br/>But in &quot;Deep Blue&quot; you have no special effects. There are literally thousands of &quot;actors&quot; in some scenes. You watch birds falling from the sky, shooting into the waters, grabbing one fish out of a vast swarm. You watch penguins gaining speed under water, jumping out and finally (more or less) safely landing with their round bellies on the sheets of ice. And you&#39;re worried about little fish hiding under rocks when carnivore fishes arrive searching for food.<br/><br/>You might have seen most of the animals before, but when they take you some kilometers down you enter a completely different and very fascinating world, which I have never seen before in another documentary - at least not in this clarity.<br/><br/>Down there in this seemingly live threatening environment very, very odd and sometimes scary looking creatures are lingering around. Sometimes you wonder yourself if they just dropped you out of the documentary throwing you right into a science fiction movie.<br/><br/>There are tiny creatures, partly transparent, with moving light bars on their bodies pulsating in rainbow colors. There are little ones generating bright flashes to baffle their enemies. And, well, if you&#39;ve seen &quot;Finding Nemo&quot; you might recognize the scary looking carnivore with a &quot;light bulb&quot; on his head attracting innocent little fishies.....<br/><br/>So... I rated this documentary 8/10. It&#39;s not perfect in my opinion. There is a narrator sometimes throwing in some sentences which are more or less describing the current scene. I think he speaks about 10-15 times in the whole movie. This goes well with the pace and the atmosphere (would be disturbed by too much speaking), but gives you nearly no information about the animals you see on screen. A tiny subtitle in one of the lower edges might have been great showing you the names of the creatures you&#39;re currently looking at.<br/><br/>Also I would have done the cutting in a slightly different way. Some scenes are perfect, just beautiful and overwhelming, where other scenes are very much like in the usual TV documentaries.<br/><br/>Overall, this movie is worth watching in the cinema if you have the opportunity to do so. Also, the more people learn to admire the wonders of the ocean, the more chances mankind may have to protect it in the future.

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Reviewed by Carlos deVillalvilla 7

Liked &quot;Winged Migration&quot; and &quot;Microcosmos,&quot; &quot;Deep Blue&quot; is a big-screen nature documentary patiently filmed over a period of years. As &quot;Winged Migration&quot; concentrated on the creatures of the air, so &quot;Deep Blue&quot; focuses on creatures of the sea. Reminding us how little we have explored the liquid space of our own oceans, the images here can be beautiful and graceful (dolphins playing in the surf), humorous (a mass of crabs laying eggs on the sand) as well as grim and deadly (killer whales attacking and eating seal pups). The moments of beauty are poignant indeed, and &quot;Deep Blue&quot; has it&#39;s share of &quot;wow&quot; moments. It divides itself into various themes; the shallows, the shoreline, the open seas, the polar seas, and the deep. The latter is shot near the deepest places on earth, and several creatures never before photographed are displayed in all their bioluminescent glory. The penguins shooting out of the ocean like biological missiles is quite amazing, and the feeding frenzy of the sharks is terrifying. Michael Gambon&#39;s narration is rarely intrusive, but it isn&#39;t as informative as I would have liked; they could have used some graphics to at least give you an idea of what creatures you were seeing, or where the shots were located. Still, this is a beautiful film, much of which was filmed for the &quot;Blue Planet&quot; BBC series. It looks frightfully gorgeous on the big screen, although parents should be warned that the seal pup death scenes can be terrifying to younger or more sensitive viewers.

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